The Canadian economy added 378,000 jobs in September, lowering the unemployment rate to nine percent, the state statistics agency reported Friday.

The Canadian economy created 378,000 jobs in September, adding to the 246,000 created in August, as the country recovers from the crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, although the workforce still has 720,000 jobs. I work less than in February.

 Labor earnings were higher than expected by analysts and reduced the unemployment rate in the country to 9%. In February, unemployment was 5.6% and in May it shot up to 13.7%.

The public body Statistics Canada (EC) pointed out this Friday that in March and April the Canadian economy lost a record number of 3 million jobs as a result of the restrictions imposed by the country’s authorities to try to stop the spread of the disease.

But with the relaxation of the economic and social confinement measures, companies have begun to hire workers again, especially since June.

Right now, the Canadian economy has recovered more than 75% of the jobs lost since February.

EC explained that most of the jobs recovered in September were full-time and only 44,000 were part-time. The figures also indicate that the number of Canadians employed but working fewer hours than normal due to the pandemic fell by 108,000 people.

One of the main factors for the strong job creation in September was back to school .

“As students returned to school in August and September, various jurisdictions increased staffing levels for classroom adaptations,” The public body Statistics Canada (EC) Explained.

Compared to employment levels a year ago, 32,000 more people were hired in the educational services sector in September than in 2019, the agency added.

But EC also warned that job recovery is being more of a problem for low-wage people.

From February to April, the level of employment in this category fell by 38.1% while in the rest of employees the fall was 12.7%.

And in September, the number of low-wage people employed was 22.1% lower than in the same month in 2019. However, employment among the best-paid people increased 2.3% compared to a year ago.

Half of the fall in employment among the lowest paid workers in September was concentrated in three sectors: retail trade, hotel services and food services.

The Canadian economy added 378,000 jobs in September, lowering the unemployment rate to nine percent, the state statistics agency reported Friday.

The Canadian economy created 378,000 jobs in September, adding to the 246,000 created in August, as the country recovers from the crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, although the workforce still has 720,000 jobs. I work less than in February.

 Labor earnings were higher than expected by analysts and reduced the unemployment rate in the country to 9%. In February, unemployment was 5.6% and in May it shot up to 13.7%.

The public body Statistics Canada (EC) pointed out this Friday that in March and April the Canadian economy lost a record number of 3 million jobs as a result of the restrictions imposed by the country’s authorities to try to stop the spread of the disease.

But with the relaxation of the economic and social confinement measures, companies have begun to hire workers again, especially since June.

Right now, the Canadian economy has recovered more than 75% of the jobs lost since February.

EC explained that most of the jobs recovered in September were full-time and only 44,000 were part-time. The figures also indicate that the number of Canadians employed but working fewer hours than normal due to the pandemic fell by 108,000 people.

One of the main factors for the strong job creation in September was back to school .

“As students returned to school in August and September, various jurisdictions increased staffing levels for classroom adaptations,” The public body Statistics Canada (EC) Explained.

Compared to employment levels a year ago, 32,000 more people were hired in the educational services sector in September than in 2019, the agency added.

But EC also warned that job recovery is being more of a problem for low-wage people.

From February to April, the level of employment in this category fell by 38.1% while in the rest of employees the fall was 12.7%.

And in September, the number of low-wage people employed was 22.1% lower than in the same month in 2019. However, employment among the best-paid people increased 2.3% compared to a year ago.

Half of the fall in employment among the lowest paid workers in September was concentrated in three sectors: retail trade, hotel services and food services.